¿Por qué la NASA funcionaba bien en los 60 y mal ahora?

Avatar de Usuario
Telescopio
Mensajes: 3186
Registrado: 13 Dic 2004, 00:00
Ubicación: España y olé
Contactar:

¿Por qué la NASA funcionaba bien en los 60 y mal ahora?

Mensajepor Telescopio » 14 Mar 2005, 14:03

Hola

Os paso un artículo de Jeffrey F. Bell, especialista en Planetología de la Universidad de Honolulu (Hawaii) que seguramente ayudará a aclarar por qué la NASA funcionaba tan bien en los años 60 y lo hace tan mal ahora, con proyectos que nunca llegan a buen puerto, dispendios presupuestarios, huída de técnicos, etc. El texto está en inglés, pero no requiere de un nivel especialmente alto. El artículo original se encuentra en:

http://www.spacedaily.com/news/spacetravel-03i.html

Si alguien tiene tiempo de traducirlo, ya sabe. Pero, por favor, que sea una traducción buena y no a golpe de traductor automático.

------------------------------------

"The Golden Age" versus "The Goldin Age"
by Jeffrey F. Bell
Honolulu, 17 Dec. 2003

The following extract from Bob Zubrin's Congressional testimony is a useful summary of what I call "The Myth of NASA's Golden Age". The myth goes like this: The old NASA of the 1960s performed miraculous feats of technical development and project management. The new NASA of the 1990s has utterly failed at these tasks. To fix spaceflight, we need to transform NASA back to the way it was in the 1960s by giving it more money, a younger staff, and a definite goal to shoot for.

"Between 1961 and 1973, NASA flew the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Ranger, Surveyor, and Mariner missions, and did all the development for the Pioneer, Viking, and Voyager missions as well. In addition, the space agency developed hydrogen oxygen rocket engines, multi-staged heavy-lift launch vehicles, nuclear rocket engines, space nuclear reactors, radioisotope power generators, spacesuits, in-space life support systems, orbital rendezvous techniques, soft landing rocket technologies, interplanetary navigation technology, deep space data transmission techniques, reentry technology, and more. In addition, such valuable institutional infrastructure as the Cape Canaveral launch complex, the Deep Space tracking network, Johnson Space Center, and JPL were all created in more or less their current form," Dr. Robert Zubrin, said in US Congressional testimony 29 Oct. 2003.

The problem with this program for a reformed NASA is that it is based on a rosy view of the 1960s space program that owes more to propaganda than to reality. Let's examine some of Zubrin's specific claims:

Hydrogen oxygen rocket engines: This is the closest thing to a new technology used in the Apollo era, but NASA did not do most of the development. Liquid hydrogen rockets were first tested at Ohio State University, and later much of the supporting technology was developed by the CIA under a highly classified spy aircraft program called PROJECT SUNTAN.

When this aircraft was cancelled in favor of the A-11/SR-71, the technology was inherited by NASA and the space agency made little contribution to bringing it to fruition. In fact, the RL-10/Centaur program was very nearly cancelled by Congress due to mismanagement, and the long delay in getting Centaur operational almost killed the Surveyor program and threatened Apollo/Saturn.

Multi-staged heavy-lift launch vehicles: NASA merely took existing military missile and upper stage designs and scaled them up. This is particularly obvious in the case of Saturn I, where the first stage is actually eight Redstone battlefield missiles clustered around a Jupiter IRBM. Even Saturn V incorporates the basic technology and design concepts of the 1950s ICBM programs. The Saturn contractors are the same firms developed by the military services in the Redstone, Atlas/Thor, Jupiter, Agena, and Titan programs.

Nuclear rocket engines, space nuclear reactors, and radioisotope power generators: These vital technologies were mostly in the hands of the old Atomic Energy Commission, not NASA which played only a minor role. In fact, the first two were never actually developed to flight status before they were cancelled to pay for Space Shuttle development. And many students of the NERVA and SNAP programs hold that NASA's role during the 1960s was essentially obstructive.

Some go so far as to say that if the AEC had been in total control of these programs, we would have had operational nuclear spacecraft by 1971. Senator Al Gore (I) of Tennessee actually introduced a bill in 1957 that would have placed the entire civilian space program under AEC control; it is interesting to speculate how history would have been different had this plan been adopted.

Spacesuits: The modern spacesuit was actually perfected by the US Navy in the 1940s and 1950s; the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo suits are all very similar to the Navy Mark IV design. NASA's contribution was mainly to add outer layers for thermal and micrometeorite protection.

In-space life support systems: Once again, this technology was adapted from existing systems for balloons, submarines, and bathyscaphes. It is absurd to suppose that NASA could have significantly developed this technology in the two years between its formation in October 1958 and the first Mercury chimp mission in January 1961.

Deep space data transmission techniques: This technology was developed by the military radar and civilian radio astronomy communities. In its early days, NASA was frequently reduced to asking astronomical observatories like Jodrell Bank in England to track its spacecraft (when they weren't tracking Soviet ones at the behest of shadowy intelligence agencies).

Reentry technology: Again, the key principles of blunt bodies and ablative coatings were developed for the ICBM and IRBM programs in the mid-1950s. It was the military services and NASA's predecessor agency NACA that perfected these technologies. NASA's main role in this area since about 1963 has been a series of expensive and hopeless attempts to revive the older technology of airplane-like reentry vehicles.

So history tells us that NASA is a technology sink, not a technology source. Specifically, it is clear that most of the technical advances touted by NASA and its cheerleaders during the Golden Age were really made by military research agencies and "sheepdipped" by the NASA publicity machine.

If there ever was a Golden Age of aerospace R&D in the USA, it was during the 1920s and 1930s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics was developing the basis of the modern airplane with path-breaking basic research on aerodynamics, alloys, engines, and fuels.

This tradition was swamped during the Golden Age by the pressing emergency of the Moon Race and left NACA's successor NASA oriented towards building and launching massive pieces of hardware, instead of conducting research on faster/better/cheaper ways to build and launch them.

The whole popular concept of NASA centers being full of engineers and scientists working on advanced space travel technology is wrong. Only a tiny fraction of the agency's budget is devoted to fundamental R&D. Most of this takes place at the centers inherited from the former NACA (Langley, Lewis/Glenn, and Ames) where a vestige of the old aeronautical R&D tradition survives.

Fundamental research on SPACE flight at NASA is practically nonexistent -- unless one counts the pseudo-research funded by the "Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Program" on such quack subjects as gravity screening and antimatter.

The entrenched NASA cultural trait of favoring operations instead of research started back during the Golden Age of the 1960s and is not a product of the Goldin Age of the 1990s. When NASA received its marching orders to the Moon in May 1961, it had only 8.5 years to complete Project Apollo. Given this highly compressed schedule, there simply was no time to develop any fundamentally new technology like nuclear rockets.

From the narrow perspective of the Moon Race, NASA managers were quite correct to spend their money on scaling up existing engines, boosters, and Rvs instead of pursuing blue-sky solutions that might not work. (Even liquid hydrogen was a dangerous gamble in this environment; had that technology failed the Moon Race would certainly have been lost.) Apollo was not a second Manhattan Project, but rather a second D-Day -- a victory won by means of a massive investment of resources that the other side just didn't have.

Many NASA critics believe that we can recreate the NASA of the Apollo era by establishing a list of ambitious near-term goals for NASA (there is even a bill to do his now before Congress). I believe that this policy would only repeat JFK's mistake of 1961 and hobble us with another generation of low-performance chemical spaceships that would just be too expensive to get us to Mars or anywhere else of interest.

Also, it would probably force NASA to adopt the kind of shortcuts and safety omissions that gave the Apollo missions a high level of risk (e.g. the decision to conduct the moon missions during an intense solar maximum when astronaut-frying solar flares were unusually frequent).

Zubrin's praise of NASA's "valuable institutional infrastructure" also propagates some common errors:

Cape Canaveral launch complex: Cape Canaveral was developed by the USAF, and to this day remains an Air Force Station, NOT part of NASA's Kennedy Space Center as most people think. KSC consists only of the decaying Launch Complex 39 on nearby Merrit Island that supported the Saturn V and Shuttle programs.

All other boosters and spacecraft have been launched from the Air Force base, mostly from converted ICBM test facilities that were planned before NASA even existed. The supporting range safety and tracking facilities for both KSC and CCAFS launches are entirely funded and controlled by the Air Force.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory: As one can tell from its phony camouflage name, this facility originally was a top-secret military lab. It was started by the US Navy during WWII for solid rocket research, then was transferred to the US Army to provide some competition to the technically backward ex-German group at Redstone Arsenal. JPL got into the space age by building the Explorer I satellite in 1958, and was then included in the mass transfer of military bases to the new NASA.

However, it is NOT a NASA center any more than Cape Canaveral is. It is officially part of the California Institute of Technology, which gets a big "management fee" from NASA every year in return for letting NASA actually run it. But JPL retains some important kinds of freedom that other parts of NASA can only dream of.

For instance, JPL staff are not part of the dysfunctional NASA civil-service promotion and pay system (if pressed I could actually name one or two people who were fired from JPL for incompetence). This semi-independent status is the reason JPL still has a core of bright young technicians that can still produce a successful unmanned mission -- on the rare occasions when NASA HQ leaves them alone.

Johnson Space Center: You can't deny that this magnificent facility was constructed by NASA, but many observers have grave doubts that moving the core management of the manned program to Houston from Langley VA was a wise move.

It distanced them from NASA HQ in Washington, and started a pointless Montagues v. Capulets feud with NASA-Marshall that still hobbles the program forty years later. The huge costs of JSC and the rest of NASA's over-large and over-elaborate 1960s infrastructure have been a crippling burden in later decades of lower budgets.

I hate to flog Bob Zubrin, because he has produced much of the out-of-the-box thinking that we need to work out a new pathway in space. But we can't go forward by copying the mistakes of an imaginary Golden Age NASA that didn't achieve a fraction of the feats he claims for it, and in many ways was just as dysfunctional as the Goldin Age NASA which we armchair critics like to bash.

Dr. Jeffrey F. Bell is Adjunct Professor of Planetology at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. The opinions expressed in this article are his own and do not represent the views of the University

-----------------

Saludos

Avatar de Usuario
Beam
Mensajes: 226
Registrado: 13 Dic 2004, 00:00
Ubicación: Vigo

Mensajepor Beam » 14 Mar 2005, 16:03

Telescopio, yo pienso que nunca dejarás de impresionarnos.

Lo que ese texto dice es la confirmación de lo que yo tansólo tenía ligeras sospechas:

La mayoría de la tecnología que tienen ni siquiera es suya. Se han limitado a mejorarla un poco. Yo pensaba que esa tecnología databa de los años 60, pero es muy cachondo leer que data de los años 20 y 30.
La gente que controla algo se va a las empresas privadas. Por lo que veo en el JPL tienen un grupo de técnicos jóvenes capaces de llevar a cabo misiones no tripuladas, pero que sólo hacen algo cuando les dejan.
Gastan más en propaganda que en I+D.

O sea, que en la NASA no hay ninguna motivación por investigar nada ni hacer nada nuevo. En el 90% es una institución llena de hombres del cromañón que funciona a golpe de pasta, que no saben ni destapar un bolígrafo y que lo único que les preocupa es que les llegue dinero. Si les recortan los presupuestos, se apresuran a denunciarlo, pero nunca ponen una solución para que un proyecto siga adelante con menos prepupuesto.

Desde luego que la impresión que tenía hasta ahora de la NASA era mala, pero ahora es patética. Así no me estraña que los rusos pongan un cohete en órbita por 4 veces menos dinero que los americanos. No son productivos. El gobierno USA se ha dado cuenta y les cierra el grifo. Me parece lógico.

Yo creo que necesitan una verdadera reestructuración. De ahí que el gobierno USA cierre el grifo para ver si los capos se largan o que se jubilen. Es más barato esperar a que se jubilen que despedirlos, aparte de la repercusión social que el tema iba a tener.

Yo creo que la solución al problema pasaría por privatizar la institución. De ese modo se crearía la necesidad de ser productivo y el que no valiese... a la calle.

Avatar de Usuario
Jean
Mensajes: 39
Registrado: 28 Ene 2005, 00:00
Ubicación: Daganzo

Mensajepor Jean » 14 Mar 2005, 16:27

No hay que dejarse manipular por una opinion poco contrastada. En la NASA actualmente hay gente muy cualificada.
Con la cantidad de programas que tienen en curso, la mayoria militares, dudo de la veracidad de esos comentarios.
La única explicación que debe buscarse está en la reducción del presupuesto e ingenieros para el espacio, que es actualmente un 10% del que hubo en los años 60.
Y teniendo en cuenta que el presupuesto ESA actual ronda el 10% de la NASA, podemos imaginarnos quien gasta mas en propaganda.

Si los rusos siguen lanzando con mucho éxito es por que no han variado la tecnología desde los años 60. Hay una máxima en el espacio: si algo funciona, no lo toques.

Avatar de Usuario
Telescopio
Mensajes: 3186
Registrado: 13 Dic 2004, 00:00
Ubicación: España y olé
Contactar:

Mensajepor Telescopio » 14 Mar 2005, 17:53

Jean escribió:No hay que dejarse manipular por una opinion poco contrastada. En la NASA actualmente hay gente muy cualificada [...] Y teniendo en cuenta que el presupuesto ESA actual ronda el 10% de la NASA, podemos imaginarnos quien gasta mas en propaganda.


¿Opinión poco contrastada la de Jeffrey F. Bell? ¡Por favor! La opinión de este caballero -uno de los mejores expertos norteamericanos en política espacial- está de sobra respetada, y es un feroz crítico de los dislates de la NASA (y no sólo de la agencia americana; su artículo -disponible en SpaceDaily.com- sobre la cagada de la Beagle 2 es una gozada). Si por algo se caracteriza es por ser un "realo", un realista contumaz que se ríe a mandíbula batiente de los "space cadets", los entusiastas del espacio norteamericanos con argumentos de gran solidez. Nada de lo que dice Bell sobre las "fuentes tecnológicas" de la NASA es una revelación propia: puede encontrarse en cualquier libro medianamente documentado sobre la historia del programa lunar Apolo o la historia de la astronáutica.

Es en esas fuentes donde podemos leer, por ejemplo, que la NASA -tras quedarse sin objetivo con el éxito del programa Apolo- trató de convencer al presidente Nixon de embarcarse en un mastodóstico e increiblemente caro programa de "conquista de Marte" con naves tripuladas. El proyecto (muy desarrollado) incluía el lanzamiento de un montón de cohetes Saturno V para poner en órbita dos naves de propulsión nuclear (con sus correspondientes aceleradores atómicos) con una media docena de astronautas a bordo de cada una en un viaje de 3 años de duración. Ni que decir tiene que Nixon (con las zarpas todavía metidas en el follón de Vietnam y con una recesión a la vuelta de la esquina) mandó a paseo a los de la NASA, que entonces se sacaron de la manga el programa "Shuttle".

Estoy sólo parcialmente de acuerdo con lo que dices sobre los rusos, pues los cohetes Protón o las cápsulas Soyuz TMP empleadas hoy en día por Rusia tienen muy poco que ver con las empleadas en los 70, aunque por fuera parezcan iguales. y eso por no hablar del proyecto Clipper. Pero en el caso de la ESA, sinceramente, no entiendo el comentario.

El retorno científico de la ESA es muy superior al de la NASA, pues con un presupuesto mucho más ajustado consiguen mejores resultados. De entrada, el programa de observación astronómica y terrestre de la ESA está dando resultados excelentes (ENVISAT, ERS, PROBA...), por no hablar de los óptimos resultados de la misión lunar SMART (con sistema de propulsión iónica, una misión de demostración tecnológica) o del tremendo éxito de la Mars Express (tenéis una galería de las imágenes de alta resolución de la cámara HRSC en la dirección http://berlinadmin.dlr.de/Missions/expr ... teng.shtml). El concepto de la Mars Express va a ser también empleado en la Venus Express, de próximo lanzamiento (noviembre 2005), y también están muy avanzados los trabajos del sistema de posicionamiento global Galileo (que cuenta con el apoyo chino, entre otros), por no hablar de la misión a Mercurio Bepi-Colombo (lanzamiento en 2011-2012) o de la misión Rosetta hacia el cometa 67P/Churymov-Gerasimenko, que incluye un módulo de descenso y que llegará a su objetivo allá por el 2014 tras haber pasado por los asteroides Steins en 2008 y Lutetia en 2010.

El único fallo reciente de la ESA ha sido el de la sonda Beagle -que acompañaba a la Mars Express- en la que se juntaron las limitaciones presupuestarias con el error de concepto, pero ese error ha sido de sobra compensado con el tremendo éxito del modulo de aterrizaje Huygens en Titán, que acompañaba a la nave Cassini.

En este último caso estamos ante un resultado del trabajo conjunto de la ESA con el JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, la parte de la NASA que realmente funciona, y con gran independencia). Del JPL son también los robots Opportunity y Spirit que corretean por Marte y las misiones de más éxito de la NASA: Voyager, Ulysses, Mars Global Surveyor, Stardust, mars Odissey, Cassini, Magallanes...

Y si hablamos de futuro, el de la ESA no puede ser más brillante: además de los programas mencionados y de la colaboración europea en la ISS, ahí está el proyecto Aurora de exploración del sistema solar (misiones tripuladas y robot), el programa Vega, la colaboración con los rusos o los nuevos lanzadores que sustituirán a los Ariane. Para los interesados, ahí está la página del Equipo de Conceptos Avanzados de la ESA en:

http://www.esa.int/gsp/ACT/index.html

En resumidas cuentas: la estructura multinacional de la ESA obliga a sus responsables a estrujarse las neuronas para aprovechar hasta el último euro de un presupuesto limitado y escaso en comparación con el de la NASA. Eso sí, la NASA tiene un departamento de marketing impresionante, que funciona a las mil maravillas, siempre prestos a mostrar a los medios de comunicación sensacionales infografías de estaciones orbitales, naves tripuladas, etc. que luego se publicitan bajo el titular "LA NASA PROYECTA esto y lo otro..." , pero que luego duermen el sueño de los justos en un cajón de su oficina de proyectos avanzados.

Saludos
Última edición por Telescopio el 15 Mar 2005, 08:35, editado 4 veces en total.

Guest

Mensajepor Guest » 14 Mar 2005, 21:46

Desde luego telescopio,que no se puede dudar de tus conocimientos ni de tu implicación en estos temas,más de uno de nosotros quisiera para si mismo este entusiasmo(me incluyo el primero de la lista). :oops:
Si todos estos datos son correctos(que no lo dudo),les estamos dando sopas con ondas a los americanos de la NASA.De todas maneras supongo que intentarán remediarlo de alguna manera.De momento a llegado la sustitución del amigo :?: :?: :twisted: O´Keefe,a ver si tiene más suerte el "novato".Os pongo la noticia de hoy.
Hasta luego,un saludo
TENDENCIAS Lunes 14 de marzo de 2005

La Tercera > Tendencias

Fisico Michael Griffin

Bush nombra nuevo jefe para la Nasa
Fecha edición: 14-03-2005




¿Te pareció interesante el artículo?

1 2 3 4 5
PocoMucho


ver ranking de artículos





No fue fácil la administración de la Nasa para Sean O'Keefe: tuvo que enfrentar el desastre del Columbia (el 1 de febrero de 2003) y las críticas ante los anuncios de que el telescopio espacial Hubble no volvería a ser reparado y que, metafóricamente, se lo dejaría morir. El experto anunció recientemente que se retira de la Nasa para hacer clases en una universidad. En su reemplazo, que aún debe ser ratificado por el Senado, asume el destacado físico Michael Griffin, cuya vasta experiencia y estudios lo llevan a dominar desde la astrofísica y la ingeniería espacial hasta la administración y la industria aeronáutica. El anuncio fue recibido con alegría por el mundo científico, académico y político.

Avatar de Usuario
Telescopio
Mensajes: 3186
Registrado: 13 Dic 2004, 00:00
Ubicación: España y olé
Contactar:

Mensajepor Telescopio » 15 Mar 2005, 08:27

QUASAR escribió:Si todos estos datos son correctos(que no lo dudo),les estamos dando sopas con ondas a los americanos de la NASA.De todas maneras supongo que intentarán remediarlo de alguna manera.De momento a llegado la sustitución del amigo :?: :?: :twisted: O´Keefe,a ver si tiene más suerte el "novato".Os pongo la noticia de hoy


Bueno, yo creo que lo más importante es que la ESA está demostrando que con poco se puede hacer mucho, pero no debemos dejarnos tampoco llevar por el entusiasmo y hay que reconocer que un programa espacial cuesta muchísimo dinero. El éxito de las últimas misiones de la ESA (a excepción del Beagle 2, que era fundamentalmente el proyecto de un científico británico experto en asteroides -ni siquiera en Marte- que se empecinó en convencer a la opinión pública británica de que el Reino Unido se jugaba su prestigio en tal misión y al que durante años nadie hizo caso) debe servir de acicate a los gobiernos europeos para meter más dinero en la agencia, pues, si con lo que les dan hacen lo que hacen, imaginémonos lo que harían con más dinero.

Eso sí, la ESA debería contratar a unos buenos publicistas, pues en este asunto cojea. Y no complicarse demasiado la vida en proyectos carísimos: si la ESA quiere tener autonomía en vuelos orbitales tripulados y los rusos buscan un socio solvente para su Clipper ¿a qué darle más vueltas? Se firma un acuerdo, se meten unas cuantas decenas de millones de euros y tecnología avanzada europea en la nueva nave rusa y se aprovechan las nuevas instalaciones de Kourou para las Soyuz para lanzamientos tripulados. No es ninguna broma una nave parcialmente reutilizable capaz de lanzar a cinco o seis astronautas por 50 millones de euros (para lo mismo, la NASA tiene que gastar más de 400 millones) y los diseños rusos, cuando funcionan, lo hacen de maravilla. Que se lo pregunten a mi vieja cámara Zenith.

Saludos

Avatar de Usuario
Jean
Mensajes: 39
Registrado: 28 Ene 2005, 00:00
Ubicación: Daganzo

Mensajepor Jean » 15 Mar 2005, 09:18

Mi comentario, efectivamente, critica mas a la ESA, pues como se ha dicho, con un 10% del presupesto que dedica la NASA, "parece" que estamos ahí. Creo que hay mucho marketing detrás.

Bien has dicho que, los programas de observación de la tierra (estamos a años luz de los americanos, por cierto) han sido un éxito. Teniendo en cuenta que son programas de bajo coste, eso es cierto. Como tambien lo es los retardos que sufren, pues se comen gran parte de ese presupuesto inicial.
No quiero tratar el tema de la beagle, cargada de componentes comerciales (no calidad espacio).

Hace muy poco, se respiró profundamente tras el lanzamiento del arianne 5 con capacidad 12 T. Ni que decir tiene tiene que el programa, en su inicio, pretendía demostrar que puede subir 20T.
Hay que decir que la empresa privada Arianespace, privatización del organismo público CNES, rozó la bancarrota, y la ESA se vio obligada a embolsar MUCHOS euros y parar varios programas en curso.. Somos los mas caros lanzando y los menos fiables.

Prefiero no ser tendencioso, y que cada uno saque sus conclusiones. A día de hoy, la ISS está mantenida, desde la ciudad de las estrellas en Moscú, por la agencia rusa. Curiosamente no tienen dinero. O a lo mejor no lo malgastan en Marketing.

Avatar de Usuario
Telescopio
Mensajes: 3186
Registrado: 13 Dic 2004, 00:00
Ubicación: España y olé
Contactar:

Mensajepor Telescopio » 15 Mar 2005, 14:44

Jean escribió:Hace muy poco, se respiró profundamente tras el lanzamiento del arianne 5 con capacidad 12 T. Ni que decir tiene tiene que el programa, en su inicio, pretendía demostrar que puede subir 20T. Hay que decir que la empresa privada Arianespace, privatización del organismo público CNES, rozó la bancarrota, y la ESA se vio obligada a embolsar MUCHOS euros y parar varios programas en curso.. Somos los mas caros lanzando y los menos fiables.


Lo lamento, Jean, pero estás muy equivocado. Vamos a ver si nos documentamos un poquito antes de hablar. Para eso está Internet.

Tu información es incompleta. Como ya he contado en otro mensaje en este foro, el Ariane 5 ECA puede levantar 12 toneladas a órbita geoestacionaria y más de 20 toneladas a órbita baja. Más o menos la misma capacidad tiene el Delta IV americano. Consulta, por ejemplo Astronautix.com para documentarte.

¿Pero cómo puedes decir que la ESA tiene un buen márketing y que gasta mucho en eso? ¿En qué te basas? ¿Qué agencia es más citada en los medios de comunicación, la ESA o la NASA? ¿Cuál hace más propaganda y nos presenta permanentemente proyectos tipo "Star Trek" que luego se quedan en nada? ¡Por favor! Un poco de seriedad.

Dices que ArianeSpace rozó la bancarrota. Muy cierto. ¿Sabes por qué? Porque la última recesión económica internacional tiró por los suelos las previsiones del mercado de lanzamiento de satélites comerciales geoestacionarios de comunicaciones. En ese mercado, ArianeSpace tenía el control del 50% mundial en los años 90 con su exitoso Ariane 4. Pero esa crisis, junto a los costes de desarrollo del Ariane 5 y los errores de diseño que llevaron al fracaso de un par de lanzamientos pusieron a ArianeSpace en la picota.

El dominio de ArianeSpace se basaba (y se basa) en una política de precios muy competitiva, inferior a los de los norteamericanos (aunque más caros que los de rusos y chinos). Por eso les arrebataron el mercado. Si no estás de acuerdo, espero que me demuestres con cifras (y no con afirmaciones vanas) que estoy equivocado. Espero que no me digas que es más barato poner en órbita un satélite de 5 toneladas con el Shuttle que con el Ariane, porque entonces no voy a seguir perdiendo el tiempo.

Por cierto, ArianeSpace NO ES el resultado de la privatización del CNES, como tú crees. El CNES es el centro nacional francés de investigación espacial, que es el principal soporte de la ESA, y al CNES pertenece la base de Kourou. Pero es un organismo público que está vivito y coleando. ArianeSpace es una entidad privada que comercializa los lanzamientos y que está integrada por multitud de entidades, entre ellas bancos europeos.

Avatar de Usuario
Scorpius_OB1
Mensajes: 1316
Registrado: 01 Ene 2005, 00:00
Ubicación: Da lo mismo

Mensajepor Scorpius_OB1 » 15 Mar 2005, 17:43

Estoy de acuerdo con Telescopio:lo bueno que tiene la ESA es que tiene los pies más en el suelo y el comparativamente poco dinero que consiguen saben usarlo bien con un índice de fracasos inferior al de la NASA (a la ESA sólo le falló,que yo recuerde,el Arianne 5 y la Beagle [¿y a la NASA?]),y todo ello sin fanfarrias publicitarias (salvo cuando las misiones llegan a buen puerto como la Huygens).En cambio la NASA es más aficionada a la propaganda y a proyectos dignos de STAR TREK,LVG,ETC. y claro,pasa lo que pasa...si alguien tiene dudas,que compare las webs de ambas agencias espaciales y que se fije en el flash que aparece en la web de inicio de la NASA:

http://www.nasa.gov
http://www.esa.int
Bluestar 120mm f8,3
Nexstar 102SLT
MAK 90mm
Prismáticos
Accesorios
Cabezonería

Space... the Final Frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its continuing mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no one has gone before.

Avatar de Usuario
Jean
Mensajes: 39
Registrado: 28 Ene 2005, 00:00
Ubicación: Daganzo

Mensajepor Jean » 16 Mar 2005, 10:36

El dominio de ArianeSpace se basaba (y se basa) en una política de precios muy competitiva, inferior a los de los norteamericanos (aunque más caros que los de rusos y chinos). Por eso les arrebataron el mercado. Si no estás de acuerdo, espero que me demuestres con cifras (y no con afirmaciones vanas) que estoy equivocado. Espero que no me digas que es más barato poner en órbita un satélite de 5 toneladas con el Shuttle que con el Ariane, porque entonces no voy a seguir perdiendo el tiempo.


Pides datos, aqui los tienes.

Launcher Price (M€) Capacity (kg)
Ariane 40 60 2050
Ariane 5 150 6800
Atlas II 105 3720
Delta 7925 55 1840
Proton 85 4500
H-2 180 4050



Por cierto, ArianeSpace NO ES el resultado de la privatización del CNES, como tú crees.


Seguramente pienses lo mismo de Intespace o Spot.


El CNES es el centro nacional francés de investigación espacial, que es el principal soporte de la ESA, y al CNES pertenece la base de Kourou. Pero es un organismo público que está vivito y coleando. ArianeSpace es una entidad privada que comercializa los lanzamientos y que está integrada por multitud de entidades, entre ellas bancos europeos.


No entiendo que quieres decir con esto. CNES y ESA no tienen nada que ver. Son dos agencias espaciales indenpendientes y como tales tienen sus relaciones e intereses como Kourou.

Lo lamento, Jean, pero estás muy equivocado. Vamos a ver si nos documentamos un poquito antes de hablar. Para eso está Internet.


Respecto a lo de documentarse en internet para opinar de ciertos temas, no creo que sea suficiente. Desde dentro las cosas no se ven asi.
Solo te puedo asegurar que ninguno de los dos conoce la verdad de las cosas. Sabemos lo que quieren que se transmita de ellas.

Sobre lo del marketing, solo teneis que leer las cosas que contais. Parece que funciona.
Puede que parezca pesimista mi visión, pero la lógica dice que las agencias espaciales (civiles) viven del márketing, fuente primaria de presupuesto. Si no se presentan resultados atractivos, se cierra el "grifo".
Sin entrar entrar en los "desastres", claro...

Volver a “Astronaútica y Misiones Espaciales”